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A Tale of Two Mothers
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A Tale of Two Mothers
Khadeza and Jahanara both live in Dhaka, Bangladesh, but their lives could not be more different. While Khadeza lives with her son, husband, and mother-in-law, Jahanara is a single mother with seven children to support. Khadeza has a steady job in a garment factory, which has a clinic where she can access family planning free of charge. Jahanara works as a cleaner in several houses around the city and has no access to birth control.
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Produced by Marie Stopes International.

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Segment 1

TITLE
A Tale of Two Mothers
VOICEOVER
Dhaka, Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated cities in the world and still growing. Jahanara lives in a slum. She's 30, a single mum, and has seven children. On the other side of the city, Khadeza is living a very different life. She's a garment factory worker, living with her husband, mother in law, and only son. This is the story of two mothers, and how the number of children they have shapes their lives.
JAHANARA
Since my husband died, I've got to work very hard to look after all my children. I get up early and cook for my children so they can eat while I'm at work. Then I go to six different houses around the city to work as a cleaner.
VOICEOVER
The economy of Bangladesh is growing thanks to a booming garment industry where 85 percent of workers are women.
KHADEZA
It's important for both me and my husband to go out to work so that we can look after our family. I met my husband at the factory. We used to work together. We were introduced and later got married.
VOICEOVER
Khadeza and her husband decided to wait before starting a family, so she went on the pill.
JAHANARA
When I was 12 my brothers took me to a lady who arranged a marriage for me. I didn't want to get married so young. But my family forced me into it.
VOICEOVER
Not long after the marriage, Jahanara was pregnant.
JAHANARA
We didn't know about such things. If we'd been educated, we would have used birth control.
KHADEZA
My mother-in-law looks after my little boy when we are at work. My son will start school next year but he already has a tutor at home.
JAHANARA
My elder daughter looks after the other children when I'm at work, and when she leaves, my son will take over. I'm taking care of you so grow up to be a good boy. I'd say to my daughter have two kids. It's enough. I won't let her have the same miserable life as me. Let me mix your egg and rice.
VOICEOVER
Jahanara's daughter Lovely is only 16, but she's already thinking about the future.
LOVELY
I only want one or two children. It'll be a bit embarrassing, but I'll go to a woman doctor and get an injection.
SIGN
Doctors Room
VOICEOVER
Khadeza is still taking the pill. Like lots of women, it's a decision she's made with her husband.
KHADEZA
I've been taking Nordette 28 for a year. Is it safe for me to keep taking it?
WOMAN 1 [Doctor]
How many children?
KHADEZA
One son.
WOMAN 1 [Doctor]
If the pill suits you, it is safe to carry on.
KHADEZA
My husband brought the pills home and we decided not to have a baby the first year. I was shy back then...I couldn't have got it by myself.
WOMAN 2 [Health clinic worker]
Do you know how to use it?
VOICEOVER
Today, Khadeza gets the pill on her own from a clinic in the factory where she works.
KHADEZA
The boss has done a good thing. We get the pills much cheaper at the work clinic.
JAHANARA
If I had a stable job as a garment factory worker I wouldn't have to work so hard cleaning six different houses. I've ruined my health with this sort of work. Having so many babies has worn me out. I get ill all the time, I have no strength left in me. It's impossible for me to feed everyone, so I sent two of my girls away to work as maids. One started working when she was seven, the other was six.
KHADEZA
Without the pill we'd have had lots of children by now. It would have been impossible for my husband to support us.
JAHANARA
I can't think about the future right now. The children might become thieves or robbers, or be hard working like me. I just don't know.
KHADEZA
Life's not so tough when you've only got one child. Our family is small but we are happy.