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Brazil: CFC Elimination
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Brazil: CFC Elimination

Halting the destruction of Amazonian rainforest isn't Brazil's only battle in the fight against climate change. The country is also working hard to eliminate CFC gases that not only harm the ozone layer, but are also much more harmful to the atmosphere then CO2. UNDP is helping the Brazilian government to safely extract and dispose of this harmful chemical.

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Segment 1

TITLE
UNDP VIDEO www.undp.org/video
VOICEOVER
Brazil, a land of great beauty and even greater potential. It is an economic engine of Latin America and the fourth most populous democracy in the world. But with this great potential comes an even greater danger as the specter of climate change looms large on the horizon.
YANNICK GLEMAREC [Director, UNDP Environment Finance]
When you speak about climate change, one of the key questions is how much time is left? And we do not think we have more than 100 months to take action.
VOICEOVER
In 1993, UNDP became involved in one of the most ambitious climate change and ozone layer protection efforts in the world. After China and India, Brazil was the third largest consumer of chlorofluorocarbons, better known as CFCs. CFCs are found primarily in refrigeration and other cooling devices, and virtually all homes in Brazil have one. But CFCs are deadly to the environment. In addition to destroying the ozone, one tonne of the CFC gas used in the refrigerator has the potential to warm the atmosphere 10,000 times more than one tonne of CO2.
YANNICK GLEMAREC
Refrigerants contained in these fridges have a huge global warming potential. And so you have a huge, huge time bomb there.
VOICEOVER
As the world's leading development agency, UNDP works with developing countries to bring about lasting, nationwide change in the battles against poverty and climate change. For the past two decades, UNDP has been working in partnership with the government of Brazil in the realization of its national strategy to eliminate all CFCs. UNDP not only helped Brazil to mobilize resources from international finance mechanisms, like the Multilateral Fund for the Montreal Protocol and the Global Environment Facility, it also assembled a high-level team of scientists, engineers, and climate change experts, who helped Brazil with the technical know-how needed to initiate and sustain this effort. UNDP, along with the Brazilian government, realizes that it is not enough to make new, energy efficient, CFC-free products; the cycle must end with the total and safe destruction of CFCs from old appliances to prevent their emission to the atmosphere, or in the end all these efforts will be for naught and the process will do more harm than good.
SUELY CARVALHO [Chief, UNDP Montreal Protocol and Chemicals Unit]
UNDP is helping the [Brazilian] minister of environment to find solutions to manage ozone-depleting chemicals from the beginning, when they are produced, to the end of their life cycle, when they are disposed of. So we helped the manufacturers to change the technology to make CFC-free fridges. Then we helped the servicing technicians to collect those CFCs from the fridges. And now we are helping in finding solutions to finance the destruction of those harmful chemicals to avoid that they are emitted to the atmosphere.
VOICEOVER
Brazil, along with 195 other countries, signed the Montreal Protocol, which calls for the total elimination of all ozone-depleting substances, including CFCs. To comply with the protocol, new laws in Brazil prohibited the manufacturing and import of CFCs, and only allowed for industries to use existing CFCs. Whirlpool, like other appliance companies, had to adapt to the new reality. UNDP worked with Whirlpool, Brazil's largest appliance maker, in developing and manufacturing new, energy efficient, CFC-free refrigerators. UNDP also guided Whirlpool through the complicated process of applying for international funds to make this happen.
PAULO VODIANITSKAIA [Sustainability Manager, Whirlpool]
We learned a lot from UNDP because we had access to a high-level team who helped us choose the best equipment and procedures for this transition, which was successful.