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Farming School for Aids Orphans in Mozambique
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Farming School for Aids Orphans in Mozambique
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Where the Water Meets the Sky
The Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Food Program have set up an innovative school system with a focus on agriculture for AIDS orphans in Mozambique. There are thought to be more than 470,000 orphans in this country, and in these schools they are given the chance to learn farming skills so they will be able to grow their own food in the future.
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Produced by UN in Action.

Find out more about Mozambique's farm schools for AIDS orphans.

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Segment 1

VOICEOVER
The beat of a drum, dancing, and singing -- a brief escape from a harsh reality. These children here in rural Mozambique are but a handful of the 11 million AIDS orphans in Sub-Saharan Africa. What happens to them now, with no parents to teach them how to farm their land and no parents to protect them? A key to their survival is subsistence farming, and that's exactly what they're learning here at one of the nearly 30 "Junior Farmer Field and Life Schools" throughout central Mozambique. Kids learn hands-on lessons in agriculture: how to prepare fields, sow, irrigate, and harvest. Tradition is passed on as they're taught about indigenous crops and the power of medicinal plants. It's all about becoming independent and self-sufficient, say these classmates.
ZACARIAS MANUEL
Since we've been learning new things here we've been doing them back home too, and we're getting good results.
VICERNE BAPTISTA
So now we are teaching other people too.
VOICEOVER
But the children here are taught about more than just the basics of farming. Through counseling and dance, they're learning to build new self-esteem and a new type of family. And lessons in basic business skills offer a first step toward a future as working farmers. It's a model that has seen early success, a model that has now spread to Kenya, Namibia, and neighboring Zambia. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations prepared this report.