Loading...
Jordan Converts Waste to Energy
Now Watching
Jordan Converts Waste to Energy
Next Suggested Video
FAO Honors Small Farmers in Jordan
Garbage is piling up everywhere in Amman, Jordan, and when it ferments, methane gas is released into the atmosphere. The United Nations Development Program, UNDP, the Danish Government, and local officials are working with the Global Environmental Facility to harness the gas and convert it to electricity for use within Jordan.
Flash Player 9.0.115+ or HTML5 video support is required to play this video.
Loading...

Produced by UN in Action.

Find out more about the UNDP's waste-to-energy programs in Jordan.

Loading...

Share this video

Include start time Get current time
Include related videos, articles & actions
Loading...

Segment 1

VOICEOVER
Garbage, garbage, and more garbage. Hundreds of tons per day pour into this landfill near Amman, Jordan, in the Middle East. Like most other developing nations around the globe, Jordan disposes of waste the old-fashioned way: burying it or burning it, with devastating consequences for the environment. Destructive methane gas, which is caused by fermenting garbage released into the air, damages the ozone layer. But now, Jordan is turning something destructive into something positive. Out of so much garbage comes light. The Jordanian and Danish Governments, in collaboration with the United Nations Development Program, UNDP, and the Global Environmental Facility, introduced an innovative project that turns waste into energy. So just how does this program work? Employees remove objects like cans and plastic from organic waste like food, mix the solid waste with liquid waste, and send it into a sealed reactor to ferment. Instead of the methane gas being released into the environment, it's harnessed and turned into electricity. It's a vital function for this oil-poor nation that spends more than six hundred million dollars a year to import oil for energy. Methane gas is also harnessed from closed landfills nearby, providing even more electricity and further reducing harmful emissions. Christine McNab is the UNDP Resident Coordinator.
CHRISTINE MCNAB
It's a win-win situation: you reduce emissions, and you produce power.
VOICEOVER
So just how successful is the program? The actual reduction in greenhouse gas emissions is a staggering 40,000 tons a year. The reduction is a cornerstone of the historic international climate change treaty, the Kyoto Protocol. As for the amount of energy produced? While it is still a fraction of the hundreds of megawatts needed to fuel Jordan every day, National Energy Research Center Director, Malek Kabariti believes it's just the beginning.
MALEK KABARITI
This is a success story. With the availability of finance, this will hopefully be duplicated in different parts of Jordan.
VOICEOVER
It's a model program, a crucial first step in a sustainable future for this kingdom, and a very real step in contributing to a cleaner world environment. Kamil Taha prepared this report for the United Nations.