Loading...
The Entrepreneurs
Now Watching
The Entrepreneurs
Next Suggested Video
Where the Water Meets the Sky
Florence, Esnart, Ng'andwe and Precious all come from backgrounds of extreme poverty in rural Zambia. They've embarked on five months of intensive training in leadership and enterprise. With courage and determination, these young women defy the odds and establish their own successful businesses, proving that anything is possible.
Flash Player 9.0.115+ or HTML5 video support is required to play this video.
 
Loading...

Directed by Helen Cotton. Produced by CAMFED.

Learn more about the film.

Find out how to support CAMFED's efforts to empower women in the developing world.

Purchase a DVD of The Entrepreneurs.

Loading...

Share this video

Include start time Get current time
Include related videos, articles & actions
Loading...

Segment 1

TITLE
Camfed presents: A See Change Films Production, in collaboration with Goldman Sachs, 10,000 Women Initiative, and The University of Cambridge.
TITLE
150 young women from rural Zambia, from backgrounds of extreme rural poverty, are coming together to undertake an intensive training course. Over the next five months they will be taught leadership skills, social entrepreneurship, and how to become successful businesswomen.
SIGN
Lubwe High School Education Board
TITLE
The Entrepreneurs
BENJAMIN CHAMA [Camfed Zambia]
Lubwe is a rural community with no source of employment except for the fishing and maybe peasant farming. So I think that there isn't any money to go around. We would like to empower rural people through education, because I believe with all my heart that it is only through the giving of education that we can change the poverty cycle in our country.
BARBARA CHILANGWA [Camfed Zambia]
Welcome all of you again, I know I welcomed you yesterday but I would also like to welcome you in a special way this morning because this now marks the beginning of this very precious course to all of us, because it is the first of its kind in Zambia.
WOMAN 1
As you've heard already, they've introduced the Camfed program and our learning objective is to empower the young rural girls just like yourselves so that you don't have to struggle. Everyone, you are expected to write one expectation that you hope to achieve at the end of the three weeks. I want to learn how to start a business and to be a leader of different people.
WOMAN 2
With the expectations you've given me I can predict you are ready to learn, isn't it?
CATHERINE BOYCE [Course Leader]
The overarching theme of the course is leadership. People have to believe in themselves and their ability to affect change, to have the skills, to have the confidence, to have the vision to look around them and see opportunities where previously they had seen none.
WOMAN 3
When choosing a leader, we have to see that this person has the qualities of a leader in them.
WOMAN 4
Am I going to be a director? That is a leader who has a vision ahead of them.
WOMAN 5
A leader must be honest, a leader must be with good behavior, and communicate. That's all.
WOMAN 4
Why did you draw a picture of a man instead of a picture of a woman? Because we have taught you that we are leaders, I am also a leader, you are also leaders.
BARBARA CHILANGWA
These young women will draw men as leaders because that is what they have known all their lives. At the family level, it is the father who is the leader. At school, it's mostly male teachers that are leaders and head teachers. So what this course will do is that it will break that perception. The communities will see for themselves that women can do the job and can do it well.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI [Trainer]
Good morning ladies.
WOMEN
Good morning.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
How are you?
WOMEN
Fine.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
So, today we are going to talk about our rivers of life. Each one of you should be able to write your rivers of life, should indicate on your river of life the worst things that have happened in your lives, and also the good things that happened in your life.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
In one of the sessions that we had with the young women, we were talking about the river of life so that people can come out of their situations. They can be very free to express themselves and also to share with others what they are going through.
WOMAN 1
My life was going very good and fantastic. My father was working, my mother was not working. In 1996, my father died and my river started going down.
WOMAN 2
And he has no money to pay for my school fees and buy my school uniform and he was telling me, "It's better you get married than to go to grade 8, me I don't have money."
WOMAN 3
And I passed but I couldn't manage to go to grade 8 because my parents, they only cultivate.
BARBARA CHILANGWA
The women in our program, the 150 of them, come from very difficult backgrounds. Most of them, I can say almost 80 percent of these girls will have lost either one parent or both parents.
FLORENCE [Student]
My name is Florence and this is the river of my life. I was born in 1990. And in 1997 my dad passed away. He died. In 1998, I started staying with my mom. We only survived by using the money that dad left. And in 2001, my mom died also.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
They think that when they are coming from poor families, that's the end of their lives. So my role here is just to empower girls to be able to believe in themselves and also to feel like they can do something about it.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
Then my river started going down in 2001. That's when my father passed away. And when he died --
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
When my dad died life was so difficult for us because my mother couldn't support us.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
I'll always remember this year, when my river went down and the water was even too cold for me.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
When I was working with Camfed, I was able to go back to school again because education is the only key to success. My dream was to bring back the life we used to enjoy with my father.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
And then I managed to build my mother a very big house that she's so proud of. And I'm also happy. I managed to build my mother that house when I was 22 years old.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
Now I know that there are a lot of challenges that the young women are facing, that the rural people are facing, so I want to become a Member of Parliament one day, and I know I'm going to become one.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
You can also do it. Despite where you are coming from, the sky is not the limit. If you just believe in yourself that you can do it, you can do it. If you've got that zeal and the self-determination to believe in yourself, and you know that one day you are going to achieve whatever your dreams will be, you are going to excel, and you are going to achieve that, okay?
WINNIE FARAO [Social Entrepreneur]
The poverty that was haunting our families would just not allow us to go to school. We were not supposed to be educated and we were not supposed to look at ourselves as leaders, but as subordinate. The fact that we were not supposed to get any opportunities to go to school, but we got it, then we have to use it and use it to the maximum.
WINNIE FARAO
As a social entrepreneur, this is what I think I can go and do in my community. This is how I think I can go and make an impact.
WOMAN
For me, what I can do as a leader, I should first join the group like Cama (Camfed alumni group) and then support those people who are in need.
WINNIE FARAO
I feel that it is very, very important for the young women to understand social entrepreneurship and to understand business entrepreneurship, because the world that we are living in today, the young women and the communities that they come from, they are the best persons to deal with the challenges that they are facing everyday. For a long time, communities were not able to deal with their own challenges because there were no energetic young people to lead that process.

Segment 2

TITLE
To help students find solutions to challenges in the community, a group of international social entrepreneurs are assisting on a number of issues. One of these issues is overfishing.
ANNA OURSLER [Global Footprint Network]
The numbers of fish in the lake are reducing because so many people are taking them. We are going to learn how to be a scientist, and really look through our own eyes at what is happening in the waters and with the fish at Lake Bangweulu. We're going to take three data points and measure all of these things because we are doing a study to see if we can put a fish cage, an aquaculture fish cage, in the middle of the lake where we can grow and harvest fish. They've gone through about ten different scientific experiments to measure the qualities of water, which is something that all of them learned and can now do perfectly. The results will actually be submitted to the government, to the Ministry of Natural Resources, as part of an environmental assessment. So I think in their confidence there has been a real change, but also their skills, their technical skills about how to be a scientist, how to take scientific measurements.
PRECIOUS [Student]
I'm Precious. We used to live in Kitwe. In 2001, mom died, then after a few years dad also died. Then we started living with dad's older brother. After living there for about a year, he started treating us badly. We couldn't touch our books, we weren't allowed to. Instead we were told to start doing housework. We had to do all the housework while his children were in the bedroom reading. So that was a very big problem. I found that that problem just got bigger, so that's how we came here to live with grandma, dad's mom. My grandma is very old. Sometimes she is not able to work for very long. She can't go to the field and work for a long time. But we help her cultivate, when we go to the field we cultivate. Apparently, someone explained my problem to my headmaster. That's when I came under Camfed's support. After this, the teacher who was our mentor told me, "Precious, you should remain behind and attend this course that will teach you about social entrepreneurship." I couldn't believe it. I just started crying because I didn't expect that I could have such luck.
ALAN JACKSON [Aptivate ICT Trainer]
What we'd like to talk about now is just to find out what experience you all have with IT.
WOMAN
I don't know anything about computers.
ALAN JACKSON
So the four of you have never used a computer before?
ALAN JACKSON
We have to start sort of at the beginning. Here are some computers, here's how you put them together. Here's how they work, here's how you make your network of computers work, here's how you connect to the Internet, here's how you find out if something's wrong. There are a lot of cultural adjustments, a lot of things we take for granted that of course they will have had no experience of.
PENELOPE [IT Teacher Trainee]
Before the beginning of this course I didn't have any experience with computers. We were just learning about computers, that they exist. But this is the first time I came across a computer, using it on my own.
ALAN JACKSON
We're working with a small group, a group of four young women who will be running the resource center after this training course.
PENELOPE
It is connected to the Internet. And that thing that you are seeing there, that's where the position of the satellite is.
ALAN JACKSON
I think that they're getting the right flavor, or spirit, of IT, that they're going to be able to fix things themselves, they are going to be able to find out things for themselves. They are going to be quite empowered by this technology, and hopefully then empower a community with that same spirit.
FLORENCE
I'm excited. Before, I never knew how to type anything on the computer, but today I've learned something I think.
MATILDA [Student, 20 years old]
: You can also sell your goods through the computer. Me, I would love to know how they buy, like when they say, "I bought this through a computer." I would like to know how they buy things through a computer.
NG'ANDWE [Student, Age 18]
Because my item is sugar, how can someone get their sugar from the computer? When we started learning, I'm telling you, it was interesting. And the studies were very different from what I was thinking so it was very interesting, and I even learned many things: how to be a social entrepreneur, how to help people, even this time I'm a role model in our community. I think I'll be teaching my fellow youths and the young ones and those who are in school. When I was in grade 2, in 1998, my father passed away. The way of living started changing, it was very difficult. When my dad passed away, it was very difficult for us to find books, pens, even the money to pay for our school fees. But my mom was a hardworking mother, so she was fighting for us. When the results come out and if I do well, I'm thinking of studying law. I'm thinking of studying law because a lot of people who have done law are men, so I want to be one of the few women lawyers so that I can fight for people's rights and women's rights. At least in law I will not be the way I am in this time, I think I'll be someone.

Segment 3

LUNGOWE CHISHINGA [Human Rights Lawyer]
Why am I telling you these technical things? Because I want you to that if you are going to claim your rights, you need to know two things. One: where is that right guaranteed? Walia and Stephen have been married for three years, and they have two sons. So she's a 17-year-old girl who is a child and is a mother of two children. Is this strange? Do we find 17-year-olds in our communities that are mothers?
BARBARA CHILANGWA
Most Zambian women grow up not knowing that they actually have rights. Most parents, especially when girls become of age at about the age of 15 for example, they already begin to consider them ready for marriage.
LUNGOWE CHISHINGA
So you tell me, are any of Walia's rights violated? My lawyers, what rights are violated?
FLORENCE
Choosing, a right of choice.
BARBARA CHILANGWA
So we believe that ensuring that focus on a program that brings to their attention that they actually have rights about their own sexuality and their lives will change the way, first of all, that they now relate to members of the community, to their husbands, the members of their family, in the sense that they will go out there believing that they have rights and that no one should trample on their rights.
WOMAN
My question is, for example, I'm a married woman and then my husband is committing adultery. I decide to consult the elders, and then the elders say, "A man's adultery does not ruin the home." Yet it is contributing to the risk of being exposed to many diseases. What step can I take?
BENJAMIN CHAMA
There are a lot of myths surrounding women having sex, so I thought maybe I should speak about sexuality to the 150 women so they understand that they have the right to make choices about when they should have sex and who they should have sex with.
BENJAMIN CHAMA
Especially for us parents, it's very difficult to talk about sexuality to you at your age. I want to tell you, I come from a very big family. There were 11: five girls in my family and six boys. Today, I don't have any sisters; they are all dead from the HIV/AIDS virus. Only three of my brothers are alive. Perhaps if there had been condoms, they would have used condoms and today I would be seeing them.
ESNART [Student, 19 years old]
I was just shocked by what he said, it brought a shiver down my spine and I thought like, maybe if there was someone, someone like us today, young leaders who would have talked to those people, maybe if they knew them, it would have been possible for them to be alive this day. I think now that we are not vulnerable because we've got more information about HIV and AIDS, and we know our rights also. I have to tell the other people, letting them know how dangerous this disease is. I was born in 1990, I used to stay with my biological mom and when she died I came to stay with my mom's older sister. She's my mom now. Her husband died when I was still at school. I've got three brothers and four sisters. I love them so much. Such that when I complete I just want them to have a good future. Before my mom died, she took my real father to victim support, but he didn't respond still. He just stays in Mansa there, but he works, yes. But I don't know why he doesn't support me. I don't know why he just doesn't care for me. Sometimes when I'm sitting I just dream that I wish I could have a big house where we could all live together, just give my family the life that they've always wanted.
WOMAN
How are we going to get the overall risk? We can get the overall risk by multiplying the likelihood of the event by the size of the effect of the event.
MAN
You are managing your projects, and you need to understand the project lifecycle and the project chart, which is a tool that will help guide you through whether you are progressing in a particular project or not.
CATHERINE BOYCE
Training in financial management is a key part of the program. Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge is one of our partners for designing and actually delivering this program. The MBAT actually drew on resources, on tools, and on models for learning that are actually used by MBA students all around the world.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
We are all business ladies here, isn't it? And we are fully empowered with the skills and knowledge to be able to run our businesses successfully. We've learnt a lot of things: advertising, we've learnt about marketing, we've learnt about record keeping and everything. So we are fully empowered as young women in Mpika district to be able to deliver and run our successful businesses. Okay, between now and next week we should be able to plan on which business we want to engage ourselves in as we go back to our communities.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
Today we are going to do market research in Mansa district. In my group they have identified to do communication business, which they are very excited about.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
On average, how many cards are you able to sell in a day?
WOMAN 1
I make 2 million K (USD$400).
WOMAN 2
You make a lot of profit, oh my goodness!
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
She's the only woman we have interviewed so far out of 11 men, just one woman. One of the things that she said was that this business was being run by men mostly, so she's very much excited to see the girls actually coming up with this brilliant idea for them to be able to set up their own businesses. So she's actually very much inspired by the girls.
TITLE
After carrying out market research, all 19 groups found gaps in the market for social and business enterprises.
NG'ANDWE
This is our business plan. The total cash inflow will be 1,100,000 in month one.
CATHERINE BOYCE
We're introducing them to the business planning side: how to do a cash flow, how to financially plan expenditure and income over the time period. And they're actually preparing those plans right now and presenting them tomorrow morning in a competition.
MATILDA
Our mission statement is as follows: to make communication accessible to all --
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
We're doing very fine. So far the girls are practicing their presentation for tomorrow and they are very, very excited with all the brilliant ideas they've come up with. I think they are going to be winners because they worked very hard for this and they are very excited. We can't wait, we are so excited!
MATILDA
I know that the competition will be quite tough, but I think at least we will manage to do something, I'm thinking we'll be the first ones.
FLORENCE
How are you feeling?
WOMAN 2
I'm feeling a bit nervous because I'll be presenting the market research plan to a lot of people in the plenary.
FLORENCE
I'm also feeling nervous. The reason why I'm feeling nervous is because there will be judges and there will be a lot of people that side. Tonight we are going to write the mission statement.

Segment 4

TITLE
Competition Day. If successful, each group will receive funding to start their own business or social enterprise.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
Hi ladies! Are you ready for today? I just want to encourage you to feel confidence and believe in yourselves, and just know that you can do it, because all of us have different projects, and I believe your project is the best! So just show them that.
BENJAMIN CHAMA
Okay, thank you very much everybody. This is a very special day. We have got our judges table there, and we are going to start immediately with group 12.
WOMAN 1
And the name of our communication business is "Beyond Vision Communication" (BVC).
MATILDA
This is our mission statement. We will be making sure that everyone access communication.
ESNART
The current situation in Mpika is very worrying in the sense that there is an increase in child abuse, child labor, and street children. Our mission statement will be to provide vulnerable children age two to six years with basic education and good nutrition.
WOMAN 2
We are going to open a restaurant by the name "Big Sisters." The restaurant will offer nshima, rice, chicken, beef, sausages, vegetables, kapenta, chips and bread with eggs.
BENJAMIN CHAMA
Let's give them a big hand.
WOMAN 3
Our goal is to raise awareness in young women against sexual exploitation.
NG'ANDWE
Us, "Future Fighters," have decided to undertake two projects respectively. One group will take hardware as a business project and the other group will take advocacy for persons with disabilities.
FLORENCE
This is our budget; this is the description, number of days, quantity, unit cost and amount.
MWANGALA MUKELABAI
What inspired you to go into advocacy?
WOMAN 5
It's through education that people will know about the dangers of HIV/AIDS. We will be able to eradicate ignorance in Zambia.
BENJAMIN CHAMA
You've all done tremendously well, I think, in the various presentations. So we deserve a pat on the back ourselves, so we shall give ourselves a good hand for what we have done.
NG'ANDWE
Before I presented I was feeling -- I even started shivering. But when I went to the stage I came up with that courage, I felt something. Then, it went just okay.
TITLE
All 19 groups were successful in receiving funding to start their new enterprises. The 150 entrepreneurs will now return to their communities for four months.
FLORENCE
I never imagined that I would be a business entrepreneur in my life at this tender age. When I start having my own money, first of all I'll start helping my family, I'll be buying food for my family, then clothes. I'll be helping other children in the community, I'll be a role model to them and people will be happy about it because maybe other people never used to think that I can do it but now I can.
TITLE
Four months later. The entrepreneurs are returning to Lubwe for the final stage of their training.
CATHERINE BOYCE
We weren't quite sure how far the young women would get with their projects, and what we found was that every single project team created a brilliant business plan, they set up a bank account, they managed their funds, and they all achieved impact, which was going to be one of the themes of the course, the impact that they achieved.
BENJAMIN CHAMA
This is a very beautiful morning and a very important day, just like any other day. Now, today we are going to display what we were doing in Phase Two. We are going to set up stalls, all those skills that we learned to persuade. The first half of the team will be going around and will be sticking stars to what they think is the value.
FLORENCE
As you can see, this is our group name and number on that side. That’s the Kakabalika group 13, and the profit that we made was K200 thousand (USD$40). This is our financial records book. We are planning to continue this project because we've actually made profit.
ESNART
I think everyone is doing a great job and everyone is putting in effort because it takes a lot of guts for someone to come up with something like this. I'm really impressed with everyone, I think they are all doing great.
CATHERINE BOYCE
We actually have 19 separate enterprises: we have a preschool for vulnerable children, a loan scheme, we have three different groups communicating about the importance of education to young girls. We have several retail enterprises selling secondhand clothes, selling groceries, and selling mobile phone talk time. Huge diversity of enterprises.
WOMAN 1
What are some of the impacts?
WOMAN 2
You are going a long distance to buy talk time. For instance, here we have brought talk time very near, you are buying talk-time within the school.
WOMAN 3
I think the group is so good and they've got pride and confidence. I think they are making a lot of profit since they are girls selling talk time.
WOMAN 4
What we wish to achieve, especially in the rural community in Mpika, we want people to have big businesses. We want them to have big businesses, we want their businesses to grow, we don't want people to be staying home, and we want them to take their children to school.
BENJAMIN CHAMA
I've been going around to look at their projects, and I feel great about the achievement that they've made. I'm simply bowled over. I don't even have words to describe what I have seen, the amazing things that they were able to do: the financial records they were able to keep, and also the products, the impact that it has had on this society I think is indelible. I think it's fantastic.
TITLE
One month earlier, back in their communities. Mpika Microfinance Scheme.
PETRONELLA [Managing Director]
Our business is a business where we give loans on low rates so that everyone is able to afford to pay back. We decided to embark on this venture because we saw that most women were really vulnerable in Mpika, they couldn't manage. So we wanted to upgrade their standards of living. Some of them wanted to upgrade their businesses because we saw that some people had the passion for business. At the moment we are supporting eight women. We have eight clients. Each woman had a K200 thousand (USD$40) loan.
PETRONELLA
Hello, how is work going?
WOMAN 2
It's all right.
WOMAN 1
How are you?
WOMAN 2
I'm fine.
PETRONELLA
We've come to see how your business is going, what you are doing, how far you've come, and how you've used the money we gave you towards your business?
WOMAN 2
I feel very good about the loan you gave me. There is a difference in that in the past I didn't have a business, I wasn't selling anything. Now I am selling goods and I am making money. I am able to solve a lot of my problems on my own.
PETRONELLA
Would you like to receive another loan? If so, how much more would you like to receive?
WOMAN 2
I would like much more. Make it big; make it K1.5 million (USD$300).
PETRONELLA
K1.5 million (USD$300)!
WOMAN 2
Yes.
WOMAN 1
Will you manage to pay us back quickly, with interest?
WOMAN 2
I will do so very well! Very quickly! Easily with interest on top!
PETRONELLA
And if you fail to pay back, what should we do to you?
WOMAN 2
We will agree on what should be done.
PETRONELLA
All right.
WOMAN 2
I wouldn't fail to pay you back.
PETRONELLA
How do you feel about all this?
WOMAN 2
I feel joyful.
WOMAN 1
Thank you.
WOMAN 2
I thank you too.
PETRONELLA
Our plan is that we'll get a loan from Microbankers Trust. We are planning to get a loan of maybe K5 million (USD$1,000) so we support fifteen women. And from that I think our business will keep on growing and the profits that we'll be making, we'll be giving to more women.
WOMAN
I decided to use the loan you gave me together with my profit to buy my own sewing machine. So I bought a sewing machine. Also, that profit is helping me because I'm now able to pay my children's school fees.
PETRONELLA
I feel very proud and I'm very happy that I'm able to solve big people's problems, women's problems.
BARBARA CHILANGWA
They have had hands on practice, I think, by designing their projects, which they did. They have tried them out; they went and launched them themselves in the communities, in communities, where, before this program, they were looked down upon.
PRECIOUS [Company Secretary, BVC]
As of now, I am in a position to take care of my grandmother because of our business we are doing, I'm not even nervous about my future, I'm just looking forward to it so that I can have my own bright future now.
BARBARA CHILANGWA
They'll be received very well; they'll be accepted back in their communities because they will have proved the point that women are capable of leading programs, they're capable of solving problems, and they're capable of playing a role in the development of their communities.

Segment 5

TITLE
The Great Ones Preschool
ESNART
Our social enterprise is opening up a preschool for vulnerable children and our objectives are to teach 30 to 60 children in the first term. And when we teach them we aim at letting them know why basic education is important.
ESNART
What's a preschool?
CHILD
A preschool is a place where children are taken to be taught how to read, how to write, and how to count numbers, how to be disciplined.
CHILDREN
Well done, well done, such a good girl.
ESNART
It's also very good for a child to go to a preschool because it builds up a foundation. When that child goes to grade 1, that child will be able to count, write numbers, and that child will be very active. It's very interesting to explore a child's mind, just how they develop, how they learn, you just start remembering your childhood and it was very interesting and so inspiring and it made be proud. The children that we've enrolled here mainly are from vulnerable backgrounds, backgrounds where we find that their parents are dead; we find that they don't have all that much to sustain themselves. That's why if this preschool didn't exist these children would just be roaming around.
WOMAN
Preschools that are here are private, but us here, we provide them with books, pencils, crayons and uniforms. Then they should just pay a certain amount, maybe if that parent can't afford to bring money and then that parent is a farmer or something like that, they can bring anything in terms of crops like maize, millet, cassava, or groundnuts.
ESNART
And it's not always that all the children pay, it's not everyone who pays, and we don't chase those children away who don't pay. We allow them to learn because we are giving them an opportunity to shape up their future.
WOMAN
I didn't know I could run a preschool for vulnerable children, helping vulnerable children and maybe in the future I could do more than we are doing to develop my country and maybe develop my community. A lot of people say that, "If you are poor, there is nothing you can do in the future." What I have learned is that even if you are poor, you can do something in your life. At least in the future, you can learn and you can become somebody one day.
TITLE
Graduation
BENJAMIN CHAMA
My prayer is that these 150 women will continue with the social enterprise, with the business skills that they have acquired. I know that we cannot just leave them like this. They will need support from all of us because this is a big thing that we have built, we have given them hope and the belief that they are able to do something on their own.
BARBARA CHILANGWA
Good afternoon leaders. I overheard one of you talking, I don't think they knew that I was listening: "Now that this thing is finishing, what am I going to do?" There is no reason for any of you to despair. Camfed is committed to assisting you to get into that college of your choice.
BARBARA CHILANGWA
We will support them if they decide to carry on with the projects that they have established, we will support them if they decide to go to college, we will support them in many ways to ensure that they have the independence that we want for all of them.
ESNART
Yes, I feel that I'm a leader and I'm an entrepreneur. Firstly, I'll start by saying that I'm a leader because I know that leadership is not about leading everybody, like maybe in front, telling them, giving them orders, no. Leadership is about being who you are, being passionate about what you do, and also making others feel important, also knowing that you depend on other people for your success. And leadership is about working hard with others, being committed, and teamwork. I also believe that I'm an entrepreneur because I'm able to start up my own business, I'm able to run it smoothly, know whether I'm succeeding or I'm failing in my business. I think my future really holds so many things for me. I just feel that I will really achieve so many things.
TITLE
Ng'andwe is working as an assistant IT trainer in the new IT Resource Center in Samfy. Next year she plans to study Social Work. Precious continues to grow Beyond Vision Communications. She uses the money she earns from her business to help support her family. Florence is studying Gender and Development Studies at the Evelyn Hone College of Applied Arts. She is proud to be one of the youngest female Managing Directors in her community. Esnart is now studying to become an accountant at the Zambian Institute of Management, Lusaka. "The Great Ones Preschool" is currently educating 68 vulnerable children. Since graduation, Camfed has supported the entrepreneurs with business mentoring and bursaries for Higher Education. In December, another 150 young women from rural Zambia will embark on the next Leadership and Enterprise course. Camfed International and the University of Cambridge - particularly the Cambridge Assessment Group and Judge Business School - collaborated to design this Leadership and Enterprise Training Program, which is implemented in Zambia by Camfed. The Goldman Sachs Charitable Fund and The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women Initiative made this program possible through their generous sponsorship. Camfed supports the education of girls and young women's empowerment in Africa. For more information about Camfed please visit www.camfed.org.
TITLE
[End credits]