Loading...
UNICEF: Hygiene Education in Remote Mali
Now Watching
UNICEF: Hygiene Education in Remote Mali
Next Suggested Video
Mali: Small Loans, Big Impact
UNICEF is piloting a new program called Community-Led Total Sanitation in the village of Fadieda, some 100 kilometers north of Bamako. It relies on community leaders, like Mr. Sho Traore, to teach people how to make major changes in their hygiene and sanitation habits.
Flash Player 9.0.115+ or HTML5 video support is required to play this video.
Loading...

Produced by UNICEF Television.

Find out more about UNICEF's efforts to improve sanitation in rural Mali.

Loading...

Share this video

Include start time Get current time
Include related videos, articles & actions
Loading...

Segment 1

VOICEOVER
You're watching UNICEF Television. Some 100 kilometers north of Bamako, in the heart of the rural area of Kolokani, welcome to Fadieda. Since recently, the village proudly displays a sign that says, "Clean village," at its entrance. UNICEF and its partners in the Ministry of Health selected Fadieda among 15 villages to pilot a brand new experience in West Africa: the CLTS approach, the Community-Led Total Sanitation project. Meet Mr. Sho Traore. In the village, he is in charge of leading the population towards major changes in sanitation and behavior. In this village, a few weeks ago, people were still defecating in the open air.
SHO TRAORE [Community Leader]
Here is the place where we used to defecate.
VOICEOVER
Open Air Defecation is a common practice in rural villages in Mali. More than 30 percent of the population still does it, causing many health issues.
SHO TRAORE
Defecating in the open air is a problem because the areas are located very close to our houses and our families. Poo and flies are like iron and magnets. As soon as the flies smell poo, they come, and eventually end up on our food.
VOICEOVER
If the villagers came to that conclusion, it is because UNICEF and its partners put together a brand-new approach, a demonstration that shattered everyone in the village.
OUMOU DIARRA [Villager]
Children and adults were having stomachaches and we didn’t know what caused them. We didn’t have latrines, and when people came and put next to each other some human excrements and food, we saw flies coming and understood it was the cause of those diseases. Right away, we promised to build latrines.
VOICEOVER
Putting together excrement and everyday food provoked a strong feeling of disgust among the villagers, and the reaction came as fast as expected. In less than a month, villagers had built not less than 40 latrines. And today, Fadieda is the first village to receive the Open Air Defecation-Free Status.
DIARRA DIADOUBA [Social Development Technician]
Villagers themselves have committed to building the latrines. It’s their own initiative and their own strength. No external funding has been brought in.
VOICEOVER
Thanks to this original approach and since the construction of the latrines, diarrhea cases have plummeted in the village. And the method is all the more efficient that it is the community itself that takes responsibility of its own health and sanitation. The CLTS approach is also a good way to promote other good behaviors, such as hand washing with soap. Since it started in Mali, the CLTS approach has brought results that go beyond what was expected.
NICOLAS OSBERT [Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Manager]
We have had a really strong impact. In three months only, the coverage in latrines in the test villages went from 30 percent to 100 percent, and without any funding. This was a big surprise for us and for those who were involved. It’s very promising for the following steps in Mali.
VOICEOVER
Villagers have built one hundred and eighteen latrines, and as many are in construction. The next step of the CLTS approach consists of sharing the message throughout neighboring villages. Here again, it will be the job of Sho Traore and other community leaders. In Fadieda, it seems the message has had a great impact on everyone, even children. This is Edward Bally reporting for UNICEF. Unite for Children.